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Charting Your Basal Body Temperature

Charting your Basal Body Temperature (BBT) is an easy way to track your cycles and help determine your fertile window. BBT can help to detect hurdles for conception, like late ovulation or anovulation (where the egg was released from the ovary later than expected, or not at all) or if the second half of the cycle is too short to allow for an embryo to implant. It can show if someone is likely pregnant before it’s time to take a pregnancy test, and if there is an early miscarriage that can be mistaken for a late period. It can also clue us into potential hormonal imbalances such as low progesterone and hypothyroidism.

Your BBT is your temperature taken right when you wake up in the morning. To be accurate it needs to be taken at the same time every day before you get up out of bed and move around. Typically, body temperature is pretty consistent before ovulation and spikes into a higher temp range after ovulation. This is because progesterone, which increases after ovulation, causes an increase in temperature.

To take it you’ll need a BBT thermometer, which covers the normal range of temperature (not the fever range) and is more sensitive than a typical thermometer. This is important because the temperature change we’re looking for can be as small as 0.2 of a degree! Record your temps on an app or temping chart paper for a few months and bring them in for us to see how we can support healthy, consistent ovulation and address any irregularities to improve your fertility!

All content found on this website was created for informational and general educational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your primary care provider or other qualified health professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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